Crisis in Spain: An Imminent Catalonian Civil War Slows Down Transition After Franco

BY ALEJANDRO CESPEDES, The New York Times

General Franco died, and new waves of democratic restoration have returned to life in Spain. However, the changes that this country needs are not an easy job. That is why, the new government led by president Carlos Arias Navarro is discussing what is next to solve this political and social crisis, that has left thousands of dead and missing people. In this group, we can find the Archbishop of Madrid, the ministers of Justice and Interior, and also, some leaders that are not from the government as the Socialist Catalonian leader and the Secretary General of the PSOE (Spanish Socialist Worker’s Party).

Whether Spain has already been significantly transformed since Franco died in November 1975 is a topic of intense among many people here, but not for the Catalonian Revolutionary Front that is pretending to fight for its autonomy, even though many civil people die.  

The New York Times reported as breaking news that is coming from the northeast of Spain. The United Revolutionary Front composed of socialist-loyal Catalonians and KGB operatives have overtaken three of Catalonia´s top military bases, and have cited the lack of European Economic Community integration for protection. Furthermore, France is providing military protection for Cataluña. Meanwhile, in Madrid, a joint force of ETA, former Catalonian exiles and angry peasants have stormed Madrid demanding tolerance of their language and independence of the region. Right before the Catalonian exiles undertook their public protest, there was a massive blackout of solar panels that left the city in horror and confusion.

If Spain’s famed transition brought it democratic institutions, the present moment might well be exposing the limits of their promise. Many Spaniards are still proud of the transition as a model for achieving civic maturity. However, in a newer age of enfeebled democracy, a younger generation has a falling-out with the government itself.

The Times, as a news agency advocated on the production of very high-quality content from on-the-ground, expert, and deeply reported independent journalism, alert and calls upon the political leaders to react coherently to democracy and freedom and to take instant actions on this. To the Spanish citizens, to be prepared for this crisis that, apparently will not pass soon.

Spain after Franco seems to be more difficult as many thought, showing to the rest of the world an uncertain Spanish future.

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